The modern name Fiji comes from the distorted name of the main island of the country, Viti Levu, namely, the Tongan pronunciation. The inhabitants of the Tonga Islands from the earliest times had close relations with the Fijians, who were believed to be in the region of brave warriors and brutal cannibals, and their weapons and other products were in great demand.
The Fiji Islands are located midway between the zones of convergence of the Tonga-Kermadec and New Hebrides, from which they are separated by two extensive back-arc basins — the North Fiji basin to the West and the Lau basin to the East, as well as a group of transform faults including the Fiji fracture zone and the Matthew’s ridge-hunter.